Crafting your technical writing resume

Note: Although this post is intended for technical writing students who are about to begin the job search process, but the techniques here might be useful for other students as well.

In this blog post, let’s discuss how to craft your technical writing resume.

The most important thing to remember is that your resume is NOT your autobiography. The recruiter does not need to know all that you have done or achieved in your life so far. They have a limited amount of time to go through hundreds of resumes. Your job is to make it easy for them to select your resume from the massive pile in front of them. Use your resume as a rhetorical tool to present concise, clear, to-the-point facts about why you are a good candidate for the position. Remember, it’s not about you, it’s about what the company’s looking for.

Know Thyself

Before you start writing your resume, take a pen and paper, and do a self-inventory:

  • What courses do you like?
  • What type of organization would you like to work for?
  • What are your geographical preferences?
  • What is your employment history?
  • What professional organizations/associations do you belong to?
  • What social/extracurricular organizations/activities do you associate with?
  • What are your accomplishments/honors/awards?
  • What software/hardware/technical skills do you have?
  • What are your strengths and weaknesses?

Know your audience

In the previous post, we discussed why it’s important to customize your job application materials for each job you apply for. I am aware of the fact that this is an inefficient method of job application. But I have a workaround: Create a base resume based on the self-inventory, and then tweak it for every job you apply for.

Build your base resume

In his textbook, “Technical Communication”, Mike Markel discusses the  essential components of a resume:

Identifying information

  • Full name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Link to LinkedIn profile

Objective

Education

Include the following elements in the education section:

  • The degree
  • The institution
  • The location of the institution
  • The date of graduation
  • Information about other schools you attended
  • Your grade-point average
  • List of relevant courses

Employment history

Present at least basic information about every job you held:

  • Dates of employment
  • Organization’s name and location
  • Your position or title

Add carefully selected details of your job and experience. Provide at least a one-line description for each position. For particularly important or relevant jobs, present the following details:

  • Skills: What technical skills did you use on the job?
  • Equipment: What equipment did you operate or oversee?
  • Money: How much money were you responsible for?
  • Documents: What important documents did you write or assist in writing?
  • Personnel: How many people did you supervise or work with?
  • Clients: What kinds of, and how many, clients did you do business with in representing your organization?

Note:

  • Be specific when you write your experiences on a resume.
  • Whenever possible, emphasize results.
  • When you describe positions, functions, or responsibilities, use the active voice. The active voice highlights action.
  • Practice your bulleted lists.
  • Use the form <action word><noun><resulting in><action or result>.
  • If you have not held a professional position, list the jobs you have held, even if they are unrelated to your career plans. If the job title is self-explanatory, like waitperson or service-station attendant, don’t elaborate. If you can write that you contributed to your tuition or expenses, such as by earning 50 percent of your annual expenses through your job, include that.
  • If you have held a number of nonprofessional positions, group them together. Example: Other employment: Cashier (summer 2007), salesperson (part-time, 2008), clerk (summer 2009)

Interests and activities

Include information about your interests and activities:

  • Participation in community-service organizations
  • hobbies related to your career
  • Sports, especially those that might be socially useful in your professional career
  • University-sanctioned activities

Additional Information

You can also include:

  • Computer skills
  • Military experience
    • Dates
    • Locations
    • Positions
    • Ranks
    • Tasks
  • Language ability
  • Willingness to relocate

Customizing your base resume for every job application

Once you have your base resume, it’s easy to customize it for every job you apply for. For every job advertisement, identify the keywords in the advertisement. Understand the core requirements for the job. Then customize the following sections of your resume:

Objective:

State only the goals or duties explicitly mentioned, or clearly implied, in the job advertisement.

For example, if your base resume’s objective is “To obtain a position as a software engineer”, then while applying for a Full-Stack Developer position at say, Google, reword your objective to “To obtain the position of a Full-Stack Developer at Google”. Just insert the position title and name of the company in your objective statement.

Focus on the reader’s needs, not on your goals.

Education:

The education section is the easiest part of the resume to adapt in applying for different positions.

Emphasize those aspects of your education that meet the requirements for the particular job.

Your base resume would probably list your courses in a random order. To customize your resume for a particular job, reorder the courses so that the most relevant courses are at the top of the list.

Experience:

Your base resume would include details of all positions/projects you held in equal weightage. To customize your resume for a particular job, rearrange the experience section so that the most relevant projects/positions are highlighted, and others are mentioned briefly.

There you have it. Easy steps to customize your resume for every job you apply to. In the next post, we will discuss how to write a cover letter for each position. Stay tuned!

If you have questions, suggestions, or blog post requests, drop me a line at: hello@amrutaranade.com

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How to conduct an effective job search in technical writing

Note: Although this post is intended for technical writing students who are about to begin the job search process,  the techniques here might be useful for experienced professionals as well.

If you have recently graduated or are about to graduate with a technical writing degree – Congratulations! You’ve made it and you have the paper to prove it! It’s now time to enter the professional world.

There are many resources out on the Internet about how to search for a technical writing job. But in my experience, those resources are quite generic, and as a result, ineffective. In this post, I want to discuss the techniques I used to get my job at Cockroach Labs, and the tips I used to share with my tech writing students.

Learn how the job search process works on the company’s side

To conduct an effective job search, you first need to understand the system.

First audience – The job portal algorithm:

When you submit your resume to a company’s job portal, it might not directly reach a human. Especially at big companies, your first barrier is a machine – an algorithm that parses resumes, matches the keywords in the job ad to the words in your resume,  and decides if your resume is relevant to the job posting. So the first step in the job search process is to study each job advertisement carefully, identify the keywords, and customize your resume and cover letter to match those keywords. Don’t stash the keywords in your application materials – after all, a human will eventually read it. However, do pay attention to relevant keywords and strategically use them throughout your résumé and cover letter. Once the algorithm finds the relevant keywords in your application materials, increases your chances of being put in touch with a human.

Second audience – Human resources:

The second level of the recruitment process is the Human Resources folks. Again, they are not the final audience for your job application materials, but they are the gatekeepers. If you stuff your materials with industry jargon that they do not understand, chances of your materials not being forwarded increase. Don’t dumb down your résumé; include an easy to understand summary of what you’re describing and then follow-up with industry jargon if necessary.

Final audience – Hiring manager:

The hiring manager is your main audience. This person is your primary audience and knows what is required for the position. These requirements are specified in the job ad.  Your task is to ensure that your résumé and cover letter clearly explain why you are a good fit for the position based on the stated requirements.

Find the Right Job

A common mistake I’ve observed people making is sending out mass applications. Some people visit LinkedIn or Glassdoor, or some other popular online job search site, and apply for all possible jobs they can find. This one-size-fits-all approach ultimately leads to frustration and anxiety when companies don’t respond. A better approach is to identify your niche and target jobs specifically relating to that niche.

My own job search experience demonstrates the effectiveness of targeted job search. My niche is startups and developer documentation. When I began my job search in Spring 2017, I applied to general technical writing jobs on LinkedIn and startup developer docs jobs at startups on AngelList. I got no interview calls from LinkedIn. However, I got 7 interview calls from the 8 companies I applied to on AngelList. Find your niche and focus your job search in that area. Casting too wide a net causes you to lose focus and use too general an approach for applying for jobs.

Caveat: If you are just starting out in the technical writing field, this advice might not apply to you. At the beginning of your career, you do want to cast a wider net, try out different jobs, and along the way, find your niche.

Consider academic jobs

If you’ve completed a graduate program in technical communication, you can also consider applying to academia.

Portals for academic jobs:

Update: As Dr. Northcut for pointed out of Facebook, “It’s hard to get a really good academic position without a PhD.”

Considerations for International Students

Students in non-STEM university programs can get a one-year OPT after graduation. You have 3 choices:

  • Apply to companies that you know will sponsor your H1B. This pool is very limited and, therefore, extremely competitive.
  • Apply for academic jobs. These jobs don’t have an H1B cap.
  • Decide if you’re okay with having only one year of work experience in the US. This means that you would apply to all jobs knowing that you will probably only be able to work for a year. You can still talk to HR about it during final negotiations.

Prepare Your Application Materials

In the upcoming blog posts, we will discuss how to tailor your résumé, cover letter, and portfolio to reflect the requirements of each job to apply to:

  • Crafting your technical writing resume (Scheduled for 01/17/18)
  • Writing a cover letter for a technical writing job (Scheduled for 01/24/18)
  • Building your technical writing portfolio (Scheduled for 01/31/18)

If you have questions, suggestions, or blog post requests, drop me a line at: hello@amrutaranade.com

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Stuff I want my students to know

Me at GPACW
Me at GPACW 2017 (Image credit: Dr. Dawn Armfield)

While pursuing the MS degree in Technical Communication at Missouri S&T, I taught a section of the technical writing service course for three semesters. In the course, we discussed all the essentials of tech writing – audience analysis, research and information gathering, drafting, editing, getting feedback, and so on.

Several of my students were interested in pursuing technical writing as a full-time career. They often asked insightful questions about how do you get a technical writing job, what does a tech writer’s typical day look like, what skills can I learn now that will help me succeed in the job and so on. I enjoyed our lively discussions, but more often than not I had to cut the conversations short to focus on the assignment at hand.

Even now, when I am back in the corporate world, I find myself wishing I was still teaching so I could share the techniques and skills I learn at the job with my students.

So this blog series is my attempt to carry on the conversation and open up the discussion to a larger audience.

Every Wednesday, I will post about one topic that I want my students to know about applying for and succeeding at technical writing jobs. In January, I will post my experience of getting a job at Cockroach Labs, resources I found useful, and sample documents. The posting schedule is as follows:

  • How to conduct an effective job search in technical writing (Scheduled for 01/10/18)
  • Crafting your technical writing resume (Scheduled for 01/17/18)
  • Writing a cover letter for a technical writing job (Scheduled for 01/24/18)
  • Building your technical writing portfolio (Scheduled for 01/31/18)

Once we discuss how to get a job, we will move on to things to do on when you land a new job, productivity techniques for surviving at a technical writing job, and so on.

If you have questions, suggestions, or blog post requests, drop me a line at: hello@amrutaranade.com

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